Guardian: “NHS slashes funds for top homeless mental health team”

Fears for rough sleepers as specialist north London unit faces 42% budget reduction.

NHS Homeless funding cuts

NHS bosses are under fire for cutting back a team of doctors and nurses who provide mental health care to one of Britain’s largest groups of homeless people.

Camden NHS Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) in north London is giving the Focus Homeless Outreach team £219,866 less a year starting on 1 April, a leaked CCG document reveals. One of the team’s two psychiatrists and one of its six nurses will lose their jobs as a result.

Critics say the decision makes a mockery of Theresa May and Jeremy Hunt’s repeated claims that NHS mental health services are receiving record amounts of funding to improve care. They fear it will lead to more rough sleepers suffering mental health crises and killing themselves, and that it will add to the already heavy demand for care being faced by hospitals and GPs in Camden.

The CCG is pressing ahead with the 42% cut to the £521,000 budget it gave the team this year despite a storm of protest from local GPs, psychiatrists, homeless charities and managers of hostels where rough sleepers sometimes stay. Camden had the third highest rate of rough sleeping in England in 2017, recent government statistics showed – more than Manchester, Bristol and Cornwall.

Focus, set up 25 years ago, helps treat the high levels of depression, psychosis and other mental health conditions found in rough sleepers, hostel dwellers and “sofa surfers”, including some asylum seekers and people who have been trafficked. Its budget is being reduced even though it is regarded by NHS, local council and social work bosses in London as a model of good practice of how to reach the kind of group that often shuns traditional NHS services…

Read the full article on the Guardian website here.


New Study Finds That Antidepressants Work

Anti depressants

An international team led by the University of Oxford in the UK has carried out a huge meta-analysis of almost 120,000 people and their experiences using 21 of the most commonly prescribed antidepressants. The results of this study have been published in The Lancet here.

Please click here to read the news article on IFL Science.

Feel free to leave comments below.

Pat Kenny interviewed on BBC news!

Pat Kenny BBC news

CBUG member Pat Kenny has been interviewed on BBC radio 5 Live’s Breakfast and Afternoon shows! Pat spoke about his experience of being tasered by the police while unwell.

You can read the BBC news article by clicking here.

If you would like to listen to the Breakfast show where Pat speaks. Please visit the following website (Pat’s section begins about 1h26 minutes in):

If you would like to listen to the Afternoon show where Pat speaks. Please visit the following website (Pat’s section begins about 9 minutes in):

Please note that you will have to sign in to BBC IPlayer to listen to the audios.

Are people with depression more likely to say certain words?

According to this article on the msn website, the answer is yes. What do you think?

Curt Cobain

From the way you move and sleep, to how you interact with people around you, depression changes just about everything. It is even noticeable in the way you speak and express yourself in writing. Sometimes this “language of depression” can have a powerful effect on others. Just consider the impact of the poetry and song lyrics of Sylvia Plath and Kurt Cobain, who both killed themselves after suffering from depression.

Scientists have long tried to pin down the exact relationship between depression and language, and technology is helping us get closer to a full picture. Our new study, published in Clinical Psychological Science, has now unveiled a class of words that can help accurately predict whether someone is suffering from depression.

Read the rest of the article here:

…and feel free to leave a comment below.

Goodbye To SURGE

After 9 years The Advocacy Project and SURGE will be ending their work in Camden at the end of November, as the new provider – The Centre for Independent living\Camden Disability Action (CDA) – takes over the contract supporting experts by experience to engage with the learning disability community in Camden.

SURGE has achieved an enormous amount in the past 9 years – including setting up the original planning together to be an inclusive forum for people with a learning disability to affect change in the borough; increasing the understanding of learning disability through training many health and social care staff; more recently appearing before the Council as part of our #UnlockingRestrictions campaign.
Please do take the time to look at what we’ve achieved:

  • SURGE ‘storify – history and key achievements in pictures, videos and words
  • 9 years of SURGE’ impact summary (also attached above): designed by the members, giving details of just some of the amazing work and impact we have achieved together
  • facts and figures‘ summary – showing the great number of people we’e worked with over the 9 years

World Mental Health Day Open Mic 10/10/17 Stories of wellness

Service users and Carers have said it might be a lovely idea to have people getting up to tell us about their experiences in an open mic session.

With this in mind, a few of us came up with this idea for the day:

10  minute – Mental Health stories

You have 10 minutes on the microphone (or speak loudly – you do not have to have a microphone) to talk about anything you like around the theme of World Mental Health Day which is Mental Health and the workplace.

It can be about when you were not as well or a less positive time in your life, try though, if you can, to end on a positive note. This is not to ‘sugar coat’ people’s experiences, rather to be part of the ‘celebration’ of world mental health day. Tell us about your volunteering roles, work roles or your studying or something you like doing that has helped you in your life.

You can read a poem and or just generally tell us a story in 10 minutes, it can be as it is, or made into a story if you like, (with the names changed for example).

Why ten minutes? 

It is so all those people who want to, can have a go – so people do not have all the time and leave no space for others.

Finally, this is not a therapeutic space, so be mindful of what you choose to tell the audience and your own mental wellness.

Thank you for taking part

We appreciate it and we know others will too.

If you would like to take part, please contact Kate  On

Please note I am hard of hearing so best to text or email me

Mobile 07950 856 851